Managing Adrenal Insufficiency with the Cortisol Pump

Managing Adrenal Insufficiency with the Cortisol Pump

Citation: Adrenal Alternatives Foundation

Adrenal Insufficiency and Diabetes are both difficult diseases to manage and the Adrenal Alternatives Foundation sympathizes with T1D and T2D patients. Both are serious, endocrine disorders and we are in no way downplaying the battle of diabetic patients, we are simply using it as a comparative tool to explain adrenal disease, as most people are unaware of it.

Adrenal insufficiency is a disease where the adrenal glands fail to produce the proper amounts of steroid hormones. There are many different forms of adrenal disease, but the treatment for all forms is the same- steroids for cortisol replacement.

Type 1 Diabetes is the disease where the pancreas fails to produce the correct amount of insulin, thus rendering someone insulin dependent. Both of these diseases are endocrine disorders. Both of these diseases require life-long replacement therapy. The adrenal insufficient person is dependent on cortisol. The diabetic is dependent on insulin. Both of these diseases are life threatening. Both of these diseases require daily monitoring.

Almost every cell in the body has cortisol receptors, making it a crucial hormone. This hormone impacts multiple functions of the body. Without adequate levels of cortisol, the body will go into an adrenal crisis which will result in organ failure and eventually death. Cortisol impacts blood sugar levels, metabolism, stress response, inflammation levels, aids in the immune system, affects the metabolic processes such as the salt and water balances within the body and it also greatly impacts the circadian rhythm.

Unlike diabetic patients, adrenal disease sufferers have no meter to check their cortisol levels. They must be constantly vigilant of their own personal signs and symptoms of low cortisol. and require an emergency injection if their levels drop too low. The standard treatment for all adrenal disease patients is daily cortisol replacement medication- steroids.

Medications such as prednisone, dexamethasone or hydrocortisone are prescribed to replace the deficits of steroid hormones in the body. Steroids have a myriad of side effects ranging from weight gain to emotional disturbances. Long term steroid use has been linked to damage of the bones, eyesight and even muscle tissue.  Yet, steroid cortisol replacement is the only treatment for adrenal disease. In a normal person, during situations of emotional or physical stress their body releases more cortisol. The excitement from a happy event, the sadness from a death of a loved one or the strain from exercising are examples of things that would cause the body to release more cortisol. In an adrenal insufficient person, this does not happen. They have to artificially manage their cortisol. Their personal cortisol needs may differ from day to day. No two days are the same and it is a struggle to regulate proper cortisol levels.

The most commonly prescribed steroid for adrenal insufficiency is hydrocortisone (HC). This is the bio-identical steroid medication. This medication has a blood serum half life of 90 minutes and must be taken multiple times a day. Most adrenal patients struggle with quality of life due to this mismanagement. Oral HC must be processed through the stomach and the liver before reaching the blood stream.  This causes a constant rise and fall of cortisol levels, which results in subpar function, increases mortality rates and decreases quality of life.

 

Below is an example of natural circadian cortisol rhythm without the presence of adrenal disease-

naturalCircadian

 

The chart below is the circadian rhythm of an adrenal patient on oral hydrocortisone replacement.

UnnaturalCircadian

This image was created with Clearly Alive’s Theoretical Steroid Dose Plotter

Quality of life in adrenal disease patients is vastly poor due to this lack of balance. Oral cortisol replacement cannot do what natural cortisol can. But fortunately, endocrinology research has found a solution for adrenal patients who have failed to stabilize on oral cortisol replacement medications. The concept of Cortisol Pumping is the use of solu-cortef (inject-able version of cortisol when mixed with saline) used in an insulin pump programmed to disperse cortisol according to the natural circadian rhythm by programming rates of delivery into the pump. This therapy bypasses the gastric passage and is able to deliver cortisol in a more natural way. With this method, an adrenal insufficient patient can receive a constant supply of cortisol and will not suffer the instability experienced with oral steroid cortisol replacement. Side effects due to mal-absorption are decreased and patients have been reported to have improved sleep, weight management and experience an overall improvement in their energy levels and sense of well-being. This method has also been proven to lessen the prevalence of adrenal crises and lessen hospitalizations due to low cortisol.

Peter Hindmarsh, Professor of Paediatric Endocrinology at University College London and Consultant in Paediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes at University College London Hospitals and Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children. He is currently Divisional Clinical Director for Paediatrics at University College London Hospitals is a pioneer for the cortisol infusion method. He has done much international research and has proven that this method improves the lives of adrenal insufficient patients.

Though this method is not a cure for adrenal disease, it is an option and a ray of hope for those who are struggling with quality of life.

PumpAware

 

 

Sources:

 

Chauhan. Adrenal Insufficiency: Burden Of Disease And Cost Of Illness. http://www.ispor.org/research_pdfs/45/pdffiles/PDB30.pdf. Accessed May 22, 2016.

Coursin DB, Wood KE. Corticosteroid supplementation for adrenal insufficiency. Jama. 2002;287(2):236-240.

Daniel E, Newell-Price J. THERAPY OF ENDOCRINE DISEASE: Steroidogenesis enzyme inhibitors in Cushing’s syndrome. Eur J Endocrinol. 2015.

Gagliardi L, Nenke MA, Thynne TR, von der Borch J, Rankin WA, Henley DE, Sorbello J, Inder WJ, Torpy DJ. Continuous subcutaneous hydrocortisone infusion therapy in Addison’s disease: a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014;99(11):4149-4157.

Hindmarsh PC, Charmandari E. Variation in Absorption and Half-life of Hydrocortisone Influence Plasma Cortisol Concentrations. Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2015; 82: 557-61.

Oksnes M, Bjornsdottir S, Isaksson M, Methlie P, Carlsen S, Nilsen RM, Broman JE, Triebner K, Kampe O, Hulting AL, Bensing S, Husebye ES, Lovas K. Continuous subcutaneous hydrocortisone infusion versus oral hydrocortisone replacement for treatment of addison’s disease: a randomized clinical trial. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014;99(5):1665-1674.

 

Copyright © *2019 Adrenal Alternatives Foundation* All rights reserved. Adrenal Alternatives Foundation is a patient empowerment organization that encourages, educates and advocates for sufferers of all adrenal diseases and is registered with the IRS as a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization.

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this:
search previous next tag category expand menu location phone mail time cart zoom edit close