Surgical Guidelines for Cortisol Deficiency

Surgical Guidelines for Cortisol Deficiency

*This information is for educational use only and is not to be used to treat or manage any condition*

During a surgical procedure, a cortisol deficient patient’s body will require an increase in steroid dosing to replace cortisol. Researchers[1] have reported that in non cortisol deficient patients, HPA axis function during and after surgical procedures causes plasma cortisol levels to increase significantly. In patients without the presence of adrenal insufficiency, cortisol production rates have been shown to increase to 75–150 mg/day after major surgery.

In cortisol deficient patients, the recommendations differ depending on the length and severity of the procedure being performed. Cortisol deficiency patients will always require additional glucocorticoid supplementation during surgical procedures, but there is no uniform standard accepted regimen for glucocorticoid replacement therapy.

It is the best clinical practice to treat the patient instead of following a textbook response. If a patient with cortisol deficiency is declining, the administration of more cortisol should be a first line treatment protocol.

Anytime a cortisol deficient person is going under anesthesia, intravenous cortisol replacement medication must be administered.

If you have cortisol deficiency, be sure you alert your surgical team that you are cortisol dependent before your procedure and have a clear plan for your steroid dosing pre, during and post procedure. Any surgical team who refuses to administer steroids should be reported to medical authorities. Adequate steroid coverage is essential to the well being of cortisol deficient patients.

suggested Surgical Cortisol replacement recommendations: [2]

*DISCLAIMER* There is no universally agreed upon standard dose or duration of exogenous steroids used to treat adrenal insufficiency. Clinicians must be observant of a patient’s vital signs, empirical evidence and quality of life. It is also imperative clinicians be aware of the symptoms of adrenal crisis, which can widely vary in patients. In the event these symptoms should arise, an immediate dose of glucocorticoids should be administered until patient stabilizes.

For Minor Surgery: Double or triple the usual daily dose of glucocorticoid until recovery. Intravenous hydrocortisone 25 mg or equivalent at start of procedure. Usual replacement dose after procedure.

For Dental Procedures: Under local anesthesia, double the daily dose of glucocorticoid on day of procedure.  Inject 100mg emergency cortisol injection if patient presents with adrenal crisis symptoms.

For Moderate Surgery: Intravenous hydrocortisone 75 mg/day on day of procedure (25 mg 8-hourly). Intravenous hydrocortisone 25 mg 8-hourly until recovery. Taper over next 1–2 days to usual replacement dose in uncomplicated cases.

For Major Surgery: Intravenous hydrocortisone 150 mg/day (50 mg 8-hourly) Taper over next 2–3 days only once clinical condition stabilizes.

For critical illness/intensive care/major trauma or life-threatening complications: 200 mg/day intravenous hydrocortisone (50 mg 6-hourly, or by continuous infusion)

This information was brought to you by the Adrenal Alternatives Foundation for educational use only and is not meant to provide medical care or advice.

Download a PDF of these surgical guidelines HERE

You can find more information on how to manage cortisol deficiency in our publication, Adrenal Insufficiency 101: A Patient’s Guide to Managing Adrenal Insufficiency 

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Sources:


[1] JUNG, C. AND INDER, W. J.

Management of adrenal insufficiency during the stress of medical illness and surgery: Jung, C. and Inder, W. (2008). Management of adrenal insufficiency during the stress of medical illness and surgery. [online] Australasian Medical Publishing Company. Available at: https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2008/188/7/management-adrenal-insufficiency-during-stress-medical-illness-and-surgery .

[2] COLLARD MD, C. D., SAATEE, M.D, S., REIDY, M.D, A. B. AND LIU, M.D, M. M. Perioperative Steroid Management: Approaches Based on Current Evidence: Collard MD, C., Saatee, M.D, S., Reidy, M.D, A. and Liu, M.D, M. (2017). Perioperative Steroid Management: Approaches Based on Current Evidence. [online] Anesthesiology: Trusted Evidence Discovery in Practice. Available at: https://anesthesiology.pubs.asahq.org/article.aspx?articleid=2626031